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Examine the Evidence

Lab.

Textual Criticism is a whole discipline in itself and it would be impracticable to adequately cover all its facets in such a restricted environment as this. 

One of the major obstacles with this type of introduction is that a working knowledge of the language in which the text is written is a prerequisite. However, if you do wish to explore further this area, there are a couple of more comprehensive introductions which do not require any knowledge of Hebrew, Greek or Latin.

 

Timothy Seid provides a wonderful introduction to textual criticism. Although it is aimed at degree level, there is plenty in it to provoke interest, including a very effective exercise. For his site, click here

 

Another site is Robert Waltz's Introduction to New Testament Textual Criticism. By his own admission Robert is not a text critic and his approach to textual criticism does not necessarily reflect that of the discipline itself. However, it does give a number of very clear and creative examples. Its real strength lies in his ability to use English manuscript traditions (Shakespeare and Chaucer) to demonstrate New Testament criticism. For Robert's site click here.

 

For an list of textual variants in English click here.

 

If you would like to know more about textual editing and textual editions in general, a good website has been set up by the Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing (ITSEE) which is based at the University of Birmingham and can be accessed by clicking here.

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Lab.